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Bald As A Coot?

Coot Chick

Bald As A Coot?

While a young coot chick might look pretty bald, this is not actually the origins of the phrase. It’s in reference to the white frontal shield of the adult coot (see image below). This similarly applies to the name of the Bald Eagle, which has a fine head of white feathers. Bald also appears in the word Piebald, referring to horses, birds and other animals that are black and white. So where does this word for white actually come from? Annabel Rushton sheds some light on this in the RSPB community blog:

You often hear the phrase ‘bald as a coot’, but as you can see from the photo, they are covered in feathers. Even the chick, though a little sparse on its head, has a flame of red and orange down. So where has the saying come from? Well the word ‘bald’ is actually derived from an old English word ‘bala’ which means ‘white patch’. If you look at a coot, they have a white patch above their beak known as a ‘knob’ or a ‘frontal shield’. It is this that has given rise to the term ‘bald as a coot’, rather than because they are featherless.
Coot and chick

Coot and chick at Claremont Landscape Gardens

The Idioms website adds:

A coot is a water bird which has marking on its head that gives it an appearance of being bald. It does have feathers on his head but it is the way it looks from a distance that gives this expression its shape.

This phrase has been in existence since several centuries with the first literary use being in 1430 in ‘Chronicle of Troy’ written by John Lydgate.

Source: theidioms.com

I couldn’t find a specific name for a coot chick, such as duckling or gosling so I propose to start calling these cute yet odd looking chicks cootlings or cutelings. What do you think?
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Source of life itself
Golden roots and boughs mirrored
In endless beauty

Celebrating the beauty of Autumnal trees, this is my entry for this week’s Wex Mondays challenge. I took the photo last Monday in the eerie and wonderful light of the red sun and orange skies, created by the Saharan sand that was blown in by hurricane Ophelia.

 

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Blue Monday: Grebe On A Glassy Lake

Great Crested Grebe

Blue Monday: Grebe On A Glassy Lake

I took this photo of one of the grebes at Thorpe Lake before my swim there last week. The reflections of the sky were so beautiful. Open water swimming is just the best physical and mental exercise there is! I get to watch these glorious birds, along with all the other residents of the lakeside, while I swim through those smooth waters every week. The simple pleasures in life are the best. I shall share this pleasure with everyone as part of Wex Mondays this week. Good luck to everyone entering!

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Walk Like An Egyptian…Gosling!

Egyptian Gosling

Walk Like An Egyptian…Gosling!

I couldn’t resist this new baby Egyptian gosling for today’s Fotospeed challenge! Lovely to see the first babies of Spring yesterday at the beautiful Claremont Landscape Gardens in Surrey.