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#FeelGoodPhotoOfTheDay – Common Blue

Common Blue

#FeelGoodPhotoOfTheDay – Common Blue

Common Blue

Uncommon beauty
Common sight on common land
Exceptional blue

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#FeelGoodPhotoOfTheDay – Concealment

Concealment

#FeelGoodPhotoOfTheDay – Concealment

Concealment

Hiding in plain sight
Blending into the background
Belying beauty

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#FeelGoodPhotoOfTheDay – Tatterdemalion

Tatterdemalion

#FeelGoodPhotoOfTheDay – Tatterdemalion

Tatterdemalion

Chiffon wings of blue
Gauzy tatterdemalion
Your light is undimmed

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#FeelGoodPhotoOfTheDay – Myths And Moths

Six Spot Burnet

#FeelGoodPhotoOfTheDay – Myths And Moths

Myths And Moths

It’s a myth that moths
Only ever fly at night
Colour loves daylight

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#FeelGoodPhotoOfTheDay – Skipper

Large Skipper

#FeelGoodPhotoOfTheDay – Skipper

Skipper

Skipping through meadows
Golden sprites alight in sight
Wide-eyed with wonder

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#FeelGoodPhotoOfTheDay – The Watcher

The Watcher

#FeelGoodPhotoOfTheDay – The Watcher

The Watcher

Half-mourner morning
Rising up through the knapweed
Watching the watcher

I came across these records by apothecary, botanist and entomologist, James Petiver, while researching the name of the marbled white. I thought they might be of interest! (ref: http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org)

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ShareMondays2019 – Spotted

Six-Spot Burnet Moth on Knapweed

ShareMondays2019 – Spotted

A six-spot burnet moth feeding on knapweed at Heather Farm Wetlands Centre, on Horsell Common, last week. A little haiku poem to accompany it:

Six-Spot Burnet

In this purple haze,
Spotted, your glittering form
Captivated me.

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ShareMondays2019 – Beauty And The Beast

Ichneumonid parasitoid wasp and common blue butterfly

ShareMondays2019 – Beauty And The Beast

The beauty is a common blue butterfly, a real favourite of mine! The beast in question is an Ichneumonid wasp. They are parasitoids, meaning that their larvae infect and feed on other invertebrates, eventually killing the host. I think this particular wasp is Apechthis compunctor, which lays its’ eggs in the pupae of butterflies. The adult often emerges from the butterfly itself. No small wonder that I would see them at NT Denbies Hillside, amidst the wonderful array of blue and copper butterflies that were on the wing. I can’t be 100% on my ID as these insects aren’t a specialist knowledge of mine, also there are well over 2000 species of ichneumonids in the UK! Watching this wasp actually fly right up to the common blue that I was photographing was fascinating, even though it gave me the creeps. I just kept photographing, hoping that I could capture a shot that told a story of the interrelationship between invertebrate species. This has to be my story and photograph of the week, even if there is an undercurrent of horror about it! Ecology is all about the interrelationships within specific ecosystems. Every time I get to watch something like this I learn more.

Ichneumonid parasitoid wasp and common blue butterfly