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ShareMondays2019 – Tunnel Vision

Lost In Translation

ShareMondays2019 – Tunnel Vision

I often shy away from portraiture in street photography. As much as I have always loved portraits as a subject, I feel uncomfortable trying to capture candid images of people in public. Daft really, as it’s not so different from the music events I cover! There’s something about the Leake Street Tunnel and Arches that makes me feel more at home though.

So Much To See

Immersive Art

Perhaps it’s because almost everyone there is consumed by the art in one way or another. Urban artists, apprentices, viewers, photographers, party-goers and skaters. It’s a hub of activity, vibrant and constantly evolving. I rarely see the same pieces of wall art twice on my visits!

Tunnel Vision

Pink Panther

On this particular visit I wanted to try to explore the relationship between the people and the art. My lead image is an in-camera double exposure of a man who seemed to be just hanging out in the space. There was something about the lines of his face and his posture that really drew me to him as a subject. He was like a ghost passing through the space, not fully engaging, not quite there.

Eyes

Captivating

I tried to speak to him after having taken a few images, just to be polite and ask how he felt about me sharing his portrait online. Well, something really got lost in translation. He seemed to think that I was asking him to pose nude for me, right there in the tunnel!!!! AWKWARD! I hastily retreated and went to speak to one of the artists. That led to a much more insightful conversation. He was training an apprentice and they’d spent 7 hours working on their pieces that day.

The Artist In His Work

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Wordless Wednesday: Lighthouse of London

BT Tower London from Goodge Street

Wordless Wednesday: Lighthouse of London

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Weekly Photo and Travel Theme Challenge: Split Second in The City

Weekly Photo and Travel Theme Challenge: Split Second in The City

Weekly Photo and Travel Theme Challenge: Split Second in The City

Another week where the two photo challenges collide! I really enjoy tying these two themes together when it’s possible 🙂 Ailsa provided a number of great images to illustrate this week’s Travel Theme, Cities, including one from London’s Southbank. She says “London is a teenager, an urchin, and, in this, hasn’t changed since the time of Dickens”. These words and her photo were my main inspiration for this post.

My featured image is of just such a teenager, a 21st Century street-skate urchin, practising new moves in the Southbank’s Undercroft. Skaters of all ages and abilities have been using the area for around forty years. The vibrant street art is all a part of this community base. Love it or hate it, this is London, a city that’s not afraid to express itself!

The Weekly Photo Challenge, Split Second Story, was set by Shane Francescut, a Canadian Street and Portrait photographer. I’ve followed Shane ever since the lovely Leanne Cole featured his work in one of her Introductions posts in early April. He’s got a great eye! Every photo has a tale to tell and his composition plays a big part in that story-telling.

Shane said “I want you to become a documentary photographer and attempt to capture a candid moment of a person, place, or thing”. I don’t do much street/candid photography and I could have easily fallen back on my favourite subjects within nature, for any number of split second moments, but I really wanted to try to find my inner journalist and rise to Shane’s challenge!

 

The Southbank Skatepark gets a lot of attention from tourists! The colour, noise, tricks and art draw in the passers-by. Most photographers were trying to capture images of the best skaters performing tricks but I was drawn to this lad who was keeping to the back of the park, quietly watching his peers and emulating their styles. These skaters put themselves firmly in the public eye and they don’t shy away from scrutiny. I admire their attitude 🙂

This space on the Southbank is so recognised by other Londoners that it’s become just another part of the City’s scenery. You can spot a local easily by their complete indifference to the spectacle!

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