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ShareMondays2019 – Tunnel Vision

Lost In Translation

ShareMondays2019 – Tunnel Vision

I often shy away from portraiture in street photography. As much as I have always loved portraits as a subject, I feel uncomfortable trying to capture candid images of people in public. Daft really, as it’s not so different from the music events I cover! There’s something about the Leake Street Tunnel and Arches that makes me feel more at home though.

So Much To See

Immersive Art

Perhaps it’s because almost everyone there is consumed by the art in one way or another. Urban artists, apprentices, viewers, photographers, party-goers and skaters. It’s a hub of activity, vibrant and constantly evolving. I rarely see the same pieces of wall art twice on my visits!

Tunnel Vision

Pink Panther

On this particular visit I wanted to try to explore the relationship between the people and the art. My lead image is an in-camera double exposure of a man who seemed to be just hanging out in the space. There was something about the lines of his face and his posture that really drew me to him as a subject. He was like a ghost passing through the space, not fully engaging, not quite there.

Eyes

Captivating

I tried to speak to him after having taken a few images, just to be polite and ask how he felt about me sharing his portrait online. Well, something really got lost in translation. He seemed to think that I was asking him to pose nude for me, right there in the tunnel!!!! AWKWARD! I hastily retreated and went to speak to one of the artists. That led to a much more insightful conversation. He was training an apprentice and they’d spent 7 hours working on their pieces that day.

The Artist In His Work

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ShareMondays2019 – The Witness

The Witness

ShareMondays2019 – The Witness

I’ve witnessed some incredible artwork in London’s Leake Street Arches over the last couple of weeks! A couple of weeks ago I joined a photowalk with Skylum Software and PhotoHound that took in the Arches, The London Eye, Southbank Skate Park and the view to St Paul’s from the Millennium Bridge. Utterly thrilled to have had one of my Leake Street images chosen as one of three winners for the challenge!

Look Up

Last Friday I went up to the SheClicksNet exhibition at the After Nyne Gallery and got chatting with a number of other relatively local female photographers. What a great event it was and many congratulations to all the photographers who had their work exhibited! Feeling inspired, fellow SheClicker, Liz and headed back to Leake Street along with my lovely hubby.

The urban art is constantly evolving on the walls and I soon spotted a striking composition of a wide-eyed face, with clasping hands. It really struck me! What had this person seen through slatted fingers? It spoke to me of fear, horror, the inability to look away from something devastating. I would love to know what the original artist’s concept was! My own take on it is an in-camera double exposure, zooming out for the inverted, second exposure. The eye is just so haunting! I wanted my image to feel like fear that was spiralling out of control.

So, a huge thank you to the artists of Leake Street for this incredible, public art gallery and for providing so much inspiration with your thought-provoking pieces.

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NaBloPoMo – From The Gardens At St Thomas’

Palace of Westminster

NaBloPoMo – From The Gardens At St Thomas’

There are some pretty, little gardens next to St Thomas’ Hospital in London that really do have the most fabulous views! I captured a few of them, on my Sony Xperia Z1 phone, while I was there yesterday.

The gardens are very sheltered, but I was surprised to find a few flowers still providing spots of colour in the borders.

Next to the main entrance is an intriguing sculpture called “Cross The Divide” by Rick Kirby, which is said to represent a helping hand and the relationship between the patient and doctor.

The very best view from the gardens is of the Palace of Westminster which is equally beautiful during the day or night!

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NaBloPoMo – Meeting Place

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This is the clock face that is suspended at the centre of Waterloo Station in London. Meeting up under the clock is a traditional way to start a day or night out in the city. Even though the station has gone through many developments and modernisation, with digital displays giving accurate times to all travellers, this magnificent timepiece remains.