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Standing Sentinel

Heron at Bushy Park

Standing Sentinel

I’ve been enjoying watching the birds at Bushy Park recently. It’s quite amazing the number of different species I see in just a short period of time around Heron Pond, which is near the main car park. I’m working on a collection of images to share with you all but I start with the pond’s namesake, the grey heron, standing sentinel on the dead tree beside the car park. They’re such striking birds and a joy to watch.

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ShareMondays2018 – My Own Impression

My Own Impression

ShareMondays2018 – My Own Impression

This was the scene I wanted to see at Bushy Park but the mist had lifted at this point! I loved the poise and composition with this stag by the lake though and had to create my own impression. A bit of Nik Analog Efex and some Topaz overlays soon brought my vision together! I also processed it with more detail using Topaz Clarity. Which scene do you prefer?

The Willow Wept

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The Call Of The Wild

A Call To Arms

The Call Of The Wild

Last Tuesday I got up obscenely early to go to Bushy Park to see the deer rut in the morning mist. The mist was minimal and there was no actual rutting, just a lot of bellowing! The bellowing was most impressive though as was the Autumnal colour in the bracken and trees. Before I left, the sun had cleared the cloud away and most of the stags were having a rest. I made a little video of one stag lying down by the lake, hope you like it!

 

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Watching Me Watching Him

Watching Me Watching Him

Watching Me Watching Him

A grey squirrel perched in the acer at Bowles’ Corner, RHS Wisley Gardens, for WexMondays this week. The squirrels are such fun to watch at the moment as they feed on the seeds of trees, like this acer, and cache nuts from the oaks and beech for later in the winter. We stared at one another for quite a while, both keeping as still as possible. The colours in this acer are just wonderful! Bold greens through to rich reds with bright red helicopter seeds. I have captured a lot of wonderful autumnal scenes this last week but this dear little face kept drawing me back!

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ShareMondays2018 – Where’s Jenny?

Where's Jenny?

ShareMondays2018 – Where’s Jenny?

Spot the wren! Not too hard to find with the Fujinon 100-400mm with a 1.4x tele-converter, but it is quite a challenge finding and following these birds in the grasses and reeds of Papercourt Meadows, alongside the Wey Navigation, with the naked eye. It’s a haven for wrens and I would estimate that there was an individual wren every few metres along the short stretch between Papercourt and Newark Lock. My tips for finding them are to find a good habitat spot, go early morning or evening, listen for the chatter or song, keep very still and look for movement (perhaps with binoculars or spotting scope) in the area where you can hear them singing. In this case I tracked the wren’s position by watching the grasses moving and kept the camera focussed on those areas, waiting for little Jenny to pop up into view. Be patient, let the wildlife come to you! Information on habitat can be found on the RSPB and BTO websites.

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Green And Gold

Green And Gold

Green And Gold

Last Monday I visited my recently bereaved aunt, to take her some commemorative agapanthus for her collection. We sat in her garden, gazing on her gorgeous collections of cyclamen, talking about the therapeutic qualities of being outdoors, surrounded by nature and wildlife. It was a very healing conversation, over a cup of tea, in the warm sunshine. On my way home I stopped briefly at one of my favourite spots along the Wey Navigation, Papercourt Lock. A small patch of woodland lies next to the navigation and by the many tributaries of the River Wey. It’s always full of birds but they can be hard to spot! I actually went looking for Autumn butterflies, red admirals and speckled wood, feeding on nectar from ivy flowers but instead I found this beautiful little goldcrest (our smallest bird species along with the firecrest) hunting insects on the ivy for itself. Stunning to see it caught in shafts of golden evening sunlight! I can’t think of a better way to illustrate just how magical and healing nature is.